Affiliated

Founded in 1906.

This is the oldest Serbian singing society in North America. Its choir sings responses during Serbian Liturgies at the Cathedral. Every year in March, “Brankies” organize a well known “Night in Belgrade” celebration of the Serbian singing tradition, and put together a Choir Festival in November. They gladly sing at Weddings and other individual religious events.

Founded in 1915.

The Circle of the Serbian Sisters was organized to encourage Orthodox Faith, to help the church congregation in its work and to maintain the American and Serbian national customs and traditions, support the work of the Serbian and Sunday school and cooperate with all others Serbian American Patriotic organizations whose goals coincide with theirs. KOLO was instrumental in all the Congregation’s building projects, helping build our two churches, halls and kitchens through its hard work and fundraising.

Current KOLO Board

Mira Djordjevic, President 
Zora Voynovich, First Vice President
Dr. Vera Dragisich, Second Vice President 
Lily Kunz, English Secretary 
Jovanka Todorovic, Serbian Secretary 
Joanne Voynovich, Financial Secretary  
Laura Luburich, Treasurer 

Monthly meetings are usually held on the third sunday of each month, following the Divine Liturgy. 

Auditing Board:
Sandra Luburich, President
Millie Wilson, Milka Brashear, Andja Cekic (members)

Sunshine Girl: Laura Luburich
Historian: Sandra Luburich

Founded in 1894.

This is a benevolent and patriotic Serbian society, which traces back its origins to a club named “Obilich,” which was founded in 1878, and is thus one of the oldest, if not the oldest existing Serbian organization in North America. It contributed significantly to the establishment of our Congregation, and helped develop the Serbian Singing Society “Branko Radichevich”.

His Eminence Christopher, Metropolitan of the Midwestern American Diocese, has said that if it were not for the influx of Chetniks in the late 1940’s and early 1950’s, Serbian church colonies in the United States would have been significantly weakened.

This is indeed true, since under the leadership of their Vojvoda Momcilo Djujic, the Chetniks helped to erect and support many churches in the diaspora. This is most vividly illustrated by the plaque prominently displayed as one enters St. Sava Monastery in Libertyville. The plaque quotes the last words of the founder of the Ravna Gora Chetnik resistance during WWII and the Chetnik’s beloved leader, General Draza Mihailovic, where he expresses his allegiance to God and country and ends with the following: “In memory of General Draza Mihailovic, this plaque was put in place by his freedom fighters, the Serbian Chetniks, who have erected the belfry and contributed toward the restoration of St. Sava Monastery.”

The Chicago chapter of the Movement of Serbian Chetniks Ravne Gore was formed in 1951, with Holy Resurrection serving as their home church. In 1973, the Bellwood Chetnik chapter, which had dwindled in number following the unfortunate church split, was asked by Vojvoda Djujic to merge with the Chicago chapter.

During its existence the Chicago Chapter of the Movement of Serbian Chetniks Ravne Gore has supported its Holy Resurrection Cathedral whenever called upon to include the various building projects throughout the years. They have also helped to restore old churches and build new Serbian churches and have been very active in church relief efforts to help our brothers and sisters in the Old Country, especially most recently during the 90’s wars. The Chetniks continue to honor their oath of supporting their Serbian Orthodox faith and will continue to do so as long as they remain.

The Serbian National Federation (SNF) is the only Serbian non-profit fraternal benefit society in the United States, founded in 1901, which perpetuates Serbian ethnic, religious, and cultural traditional in North America (USA and Canada).

Our Cathedral has three SNF Lodges:

– Lodge 195; St. George
– Lodge 086; Srpsko Amerikansko Drustvo
– Lodge 124; Obilich

The Chetnik Circle of Serbian Sisters of the Movement of Serbian Chetniks Ravne Gore in Chicago aim to maintain mutual sisterly love and ties among members; to assist in the work of the Movement and in the work of its Holy Resurrection Cathedral by organizing and sponsoring patron saint celebrations and banquets, remembering the sick and collecting material means for aid to Serbians in need. The circle and chapter at Holy Resurrection Cathedral work closely together. There is unity and cooperation between the circle of the Movement and our Cathedral’s sister circle.

The Chetnik Kolo in Chicago existed since the 1960s. In the 1980s, it moved to St. Sava Monastery in Libertyville and then in the 1990s moved back to Chicago and Holy Resurrection Cathedral where it is an active organization in supporting its Cathedral and celebrating its patron saint, St. Petka, each October with a parasatos (memorial service) for deceased members and a banquet in the Cathedral Hall.